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Apple and Foxconn have broken labor laws in China for the latest iPhone

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The NGO Chinese Labor Watch reports that the two giants have exceeded Chinese labor legislation to be able to produce the latest range of iPhones.

Apple and Foxconn have been pinned for working conditions and the ratio of temporary employees in Zhengzhou factories in China, the day before an event to introduce the new iPhone. Chinese Labor Watch, an NGO, presented the findings of its investigation in the field and has now significantly undermined the reputation of both manufacturers. The organization particularly emphasizes the presence of 50% of a temporary workforce, when Chinese law allows only 10%. Other violations of the law were also noted, including the refusal of resignations during production peaks, overtime for trainees (though prohibited), and up to 100 overtime hours for employees when the limit is set at 36 hours per month.

Apple responds promptly

In order not to be tainted the day before a major event, Apple has launched an internal investigation and confirmed that “the percentage of temporary employees exceed our standards,” while being reassuring by saying that the company works hand in hand with Foxconn to “fix this problem.” Foxconn also confirmed the quota violations. Apple is known for pushing its manufacturing partners to improve the working conditions of employees. For its latest annual supply chain report, Apple says it has conducted 44,000 interviews with its partners’ employees to make sure they are able to express their concerns and be fully trained.

Adam Still

A self-professed tech and coding geek, Adam currently attends Yale University as a Computer Science major and, as a talented developer, has already made numerous contributions to open source Python libraries including SciPy and NumPy. He is the leading editor of Share Blog News and takes a major interest in technology news and the latest developments of all tech companies, especially Apple. His current phone is an iPhone XS.

2605 Copperhead Road, New Britain Connecticut, 06051
860-612-8283
[email protected]
Adam Still
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Apple and Tech News

Purism launches Librem 5, a smartphone to protect privacy

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After years of developing a 100% free mobile OS, Purism is now shipping its new smartphones.

As scandals explode on the questionable practices of GAFAM (Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon, Microsoft) that often flirt with the limits of legality, and as users desire devices that are fully transparent and easy to understand, solutions are emerging. Purism is known for its computers with the OS of the same name that share two sizes (13 and 15 inches) and more recently for its Librem Key, a security token and tamper detection tool. The company launched a crowdfunding campaign in 2017 to help build a smartphone for the protection of privacy and the public.

The answer to a public need

Mobile security solutions are geared towards professionals and governments, from Bull’s Hoox m2 to Sectera Edge from American General Dynamics, and Teorem from French Thales. By tackling the creation of a smartphone for the general public, Purism responds to a growing desire to regain control over data pulled, shared and monetized by the giants of the web. In just two weeks, the crowdfunding campaign had reached $1.5 million in donations and ended after two months with a total of $2.1 million. Just under two years later, the company has began shipping its product.

Neither Android nor iOS

Launched at $699, the mobile does not offer a high-end technical sheet, focusing instead on the protection of privacy. To do this, Purism has developed a free mobile OS and open source based on Gnome. Its call and messaging application is the first to rely on Matrix, an end-to-end and decentralized encrypted network. Everyday applications will all be launched and isolated through a “sandbox” browser to prevent them from communicating with each other. The mobile has a removable battery, a 3.5 mm audio jack and hardware kill switches that really cut off access to the camera, microphone, Wifi / Bluetooth and network. Plus, a lockdown mode will disable sensors (lights, accelerometer, gyrometer, magnetometer). Applications can be created by developers before appearing on the PureOS Store.

A light configuration

On the technical sheet side, the mobile sports a 5.7-inch IPS display with a resolution of 1440 x 720 pixels. Under the hood is an i.MX8M processor (Quad Core, max 1.5GHz), 3 GB of RAM, and 32 GB of eMMC memory. We can expand the storage space via a microSD card. For connectivity, it is based on a GPS chip Teseo LIV3F GNSS, a modem Gemalto PLS8 3G / 4G, has WiFi 802.11abgn 2.4 Ghz / 5Ghz and Bluetooth 4. The front photo sensor offers up to 8MP resolution; at the rear, there is a 13 MP main sensor with LED flash. The mobile has a 3500mA • h battery that charges via a Type C (3.0) USB port.

Adam Still

A self-professed tech and coding geek, Adam currently attends Yale University as a Computer Science major and, as a talented developer, has already made numerous contributions to open source Python libraries including SciPy and NumPy. He is the leading editor of Share Blog News and takes a major interest in technology news and the latest developments of all tech companies, especially Apple. His current phone is an iPhone XS.

2605 Copperhead Road, New Britain Connecticut, 06051
860-612-8283
[email protected]
Adam Still
Continue Reading

Apple and Tech News

Galaxy Fold: how Samsung solved its worries

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Samsung has presented the final version of its Galaxy Fold at IFA Berlin.

Last April, Samsung sent its testers a very advanced prototype of its foldable dual-screen phone, the Galaxy Fold. There were a number of issues. The concerned American journalists had various concerns with the material of the phone, and the software part was not even addressed. CNBC’s Steve Kovach and Brands “MKBHD” Brownlee had expressed concerns over the supposed protective film of AMOLED screens, which made the phone dysfunctional if removed. Samsung had quickly explained that the testers had attacked one of the 7 layers of protection of the dual-screen. As the testers were in possession of a non-commercial version, the box provided did not present the same instructions as that which will be presented to the public during the marketing of the smartphone.

Announced revision

The IFA 2019 in Berlin is an opportunity for Samsung to present the final model of the Galaxy Fold, reviewed and corrected for further testing. We were able to look into it and saw noticeable improvements. Recall that Samsung in July announced the following revisions: extending the protective layer of the Infinity Flex Display beyond the bevels, better protection of the device against external particles, reinforced protection hinges at both ends of the phone through new protective covers, additions of additional metal layers under the Infinity Flex Display and reduced space between the hinges and the chassis.

Tom Warren for The Verge finds that it is no longer possible to remove the screen protection. Even with nails, the journalist could not reach the film and is confident about the resolution of this problem by the Korean firm. Similarly, the hinges seem “more robust” according to Warren and the spacing between the two screens has been reduced when the phone is folded, thus blocking more debris. He regrets, however, with humor that he has not had time to “throw dust” on the mobile to ensure the effectiveness of these revisions.

Adam Still

A self-professed tech and coding geek, Adam currently attends Yale University as a Computer Science major and, as a talented developer, has already made numerous contributions to open source Python libraries including SciPy and NumPy. He is the leading editor of Share Blog News and takes a major interest in technology news and the latest developments of all tech companies, especially Apple. His current phone is an iPhone XS.

2605 Copperhead Road, New Britain Connecticut, 06051
860-612-8283
[email protected]
Adam Still
Continue Reading

Apple and Tech News

Microsoft will continue to use humans to transcribe Cortana and Skype audio

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The tech giants have recently been accused of passing some of your audio recordings from voice digital assistants to human third parties for analysis, in an effort to improve their services. Most have put these programs on hold – but some are still actively listening.

Like most major tech companies that offer voice assistant or voice chat services, Microsoft has been pinned down to have certain Skype and Cortana records scanned by human employees. Apple, Google and Facebook have all decided to temporarily stop these programs of analysis and Amazon allows users to exclude themselves from the program so that their conversations with Alexa are not listened to by strangers. Microsoft, for its part, decided to continue without changing anything, despite the risks regarding the privacy of its users.

Microsoft will continue to analyze audio recordings by humans

The Redmond giant has preferred to update its terms of use to explicitly state that human employees can listen to voice conversations and commands: “We realized, following the recent queries, that we could do even better by specifying that humans sometimes have access to this content,” said a spokesman for Microsoft to Motherboard, who discovered the textual changes in question. “Our treatment of personal data for this purpose includes automated and manual (human) methods,” they said.

On several pages, the company explains using voice data and recordings to improve voice recognition, translation, understanding of intent and more in Microsoft products and services: “This can include the transcription of audio recordings by Microsoft employees and vendors, subject to procedures put in place to respect the privacy of users. This includes the anonymisation of data, the signing of non-disclosure agreements with our sellers and their employees and the need for them to respect many confidentiality rules, in accordance with European laws in particular.” Although Microsoft allows deleting audio recordings, the giant could have been more transparent from the beginning.

Adam Still

A self-professed tech and coding geek, Adam currently attends Yale University as a Computer Science major and, as a talented developer, has already made numerous contributions to open source Python libraries including SciPy and NumPy. He is the leading editor of Share Blog News and takes a major interest in technology news and the latest developments of all tech companies, especially Apple. His current phone is an iPhone XS.

2605 Copperhead Road, New Britain Connecticut, 06051
860-612-8283
[email protected]
Adam Still
Continue Reading

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